Unraveling the History and Legends of Kamakhya Temple

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Unraveling the History and Legends of Kamakhya Temple
  • Admin
  • 14 December 2022

Kamakhya Temple, also known as Kamrup-Kamakhya, is a Hindu temple dedicated to the goddess Kamakhya, located on the Nilachal Hill in Guwahati, Assam, India. It is one of the most revered shrines in India, attracting devotees from all over the country.

The temple's history dates to ancient times, and it is believed to be one of the 51 Shakti Peethas, or holy shrines of the goddess Shakti, according to Hindu mythology. The temple complex comprises several smaller temples, each dedicated to a different aspect of the goddess.

A popular passage points for those of the Hindu faith, it was built to symbolise and recognize the deity Kamakhya. Defining the womanish authority of Shakti and celebrating a woman’s capability to fantasize, this temple does not have a hero of Kamakhya to worship but a yoni(vagina).

Kamakhya mandir is the main temple in an establishment of individual temples devoted to the ten Mahavidyas Kali, Tara, Tripurasundari (Shodashi), Bhuvaneshwari, Bhairavi, Chhinnamasta, Dhumavati, Bagalamukhi, Matangi and Kamala.

Among them, Tripurasundari, Matangi and Kamala reside in the main temple while the other seven reside in separate temples. It is an important destination for simple Hindus or gardeners, especially for tantra.

Let's discover the mystification, meaning and traditions followed at Kamakhya Mandir

The Kamakhya Temple is one of the most revered shrines dedicated to the goddess Shakti, and it has a long and rich history of mystification, meaning, and traditions. Here's a closer look at some of the key aspects of the temple:

Mythological Significance

According to Hindu mythology, the Kamakhya Temple is one of the 51 Shakti Peethas, which are places where the body parts of the goddess Sati fell when Lord Shiva carried her body around the world in grief after her death. The yoni (vagina) of the goddess is said to have fallen at the site where the Kamakhya Temple now stands.

Tantric Practices

The Kamakhya Temple is associated with the tantric practices of Hinduism, which focus on the balance of the masculine and feminine energies in the universe. The goddess Kamakhya is believed to embody the feminine energy of the universe, and her worship at the temple involves several tantric rituals.

Rituals and Offerings

Devotees visiting the Kamakhya Temple perform several rituals and offerings to the goddess, including lighting incense sticks, offering flowers, and performing puja (worship) ceremonies. The temple also has a tradition of animal sacrifice, where devotees offer goats to the goddess as a symbol of devotion and gratitude.

Festivals

The temple celebrates several festivals throughout the year, with the Ambubachi Mela being the most popular. The festival, which is held in June, celebrates the fertility of the goddess Kamakhya and draws a large number of devotees from all over India.

Architecture and Design

The Kamakhya Temple's architecture and design are steeped in symbolism and meaning. The temple's structure is designed to represent the yoni (vagina) of the goddess, and the temple's inner sanctum, known as the Garbhagriha, is the site where the goddess's yoni is worshipped.

The majestic Trchitecture of the Temple

The temple's architecture is a unique blend of Hindu and Buddhist styles, with influences from both Assamese and Bengali cultures. The main shrine of the temple is a three-tiered structure made of stone and covered with gold. The dome of the temple is shaped like a beehive, and the main entrance is decorated with intricate carvings of various gods and goddesses.

The temple is also famous for its "Yoni" worship, which is the worship of the female reproductive organ. The temple has a stone carved Yoni in a natural underground cave, which is constantly moistened by natural water, symbolizing the goddess's fertility.

The Kamakhya Temple complex is also home to several smaller shrines dedicated to other Hindu gods and goddesses. The temple's courtyard is adorned with sculptures, carvings, and paintings depicting various Hindu legends and myths.

The temple's annual Ambubachi Mela is a major attraction, where devotees from all over the country come to worship the goddess Kamakhya during the four-day festival. The temple's unique architecture and spiritual significance make it a must-visit destination for anyone interested in Hindu culture and religion.

Legend of Kamakhya Temple 

There are several legends associated with the Kamakhya Temple, and one of the most popular ones is the legend of the goddess Sati.

According to the legend, Sati was the daughter of Daksha, a powerful king and one of the creators of the universe. Sati fell in love with Lord Shiva, who was known for his ascetic lifestyle and fierce demeanor. Despite her father's objections, Sati married Lord Shiva and went to live with him in the Himalayas.

One day, Daksha organized a great yagna, or ritual sacrifice, and invited all the gods and goddesses except for Lord Shiva and Sati. Furious at the insult, Sati went to her father's yagna to confront him, but Daksha insulted Lord Shiva again. Unable to bear the insult, Sati immolated herself in the sacrificial fire.

Upon hearing the news, Lord Shiva was overcome with grief and rage. He took the body of Sati and performed the Tandava, a wild dance of destruction that threatened to destroy the entire universe. To save the world, Lord Vishnu dismembered Sati's body with his discus, and her various body parts fell to different parts of India, which became holy sites of worship.

The Kamakhya Temple is believed to be the site where Sati's yoni, or reproductive organ, fell to the earth. It is said that the temple's main shrine contains the goddess's yoni, and the temple's yearly festival, the Ambubachi Mela, celebrates the goddess's menstruation, which is believed to renew the fertility of the earth.

Another carnival you don't want to miss -

  • Durga Puja Held annually during September-October Navaratri.
  • A symbolic marriage between Devi Kameshwara and Devil Kameshwara in the month of Pohan Biya Paus.
  • During the month of Phalguna, Durgadeul is celebrated in Kamakhya.
  • Vasanti Puja is performed at the Kamakhya temple during the month of Chaitra.
  • Madandeul is celebrated in the month of Chaitra when a special puja is offered to Kamadeva and Kameswara.
  • Manas Puja is celebrated as Sankranti or Shravana and continues until the day after Bhadra.

Laws of Fashion and Behavior

Like most temples in India, the dress code is strictly arbitrary. Since this is a Hindu temple, you don't have to cover your head, but since this is a religious deity, covering your shoulders and legs is a must! You don't have to wear traditional clothing, but there are outfits you can name, including yoga pants and blouses, leggings and headbands, and maxi dresses.

Bhakti Puja Vidhi

  1. Selfless Before worshiping or Maa Kamakhya, decorate the pillars and his flowers.
  2. Invite godly women to your station.
  3. Greet the girl and bring food and new clothes.
  4. Kamakhya can take the place of Bhandara to placate mother. Her mother is delighted to know that her seeds, especially the poor or destitute Dharmic people, are being fed by her.
  5. Then sing Durga Saptashati to receive blessings from Goddess Kamakhya.

Visiting Hours

The Kamakhya Temple in Guwahati, Assam, is open to visitors every day of the week. The temple timings are as follows:

Summer (April to September):

  • Morning: 5:30 am to 1:00 pm
  • Evening: 2:30 pm to 5:30 pm

Winter (October to March):

  • Morning: 6:30 am to 1:00 pm
  • Evening: 2:30 pm to 5:30 pm

Note that the temple may be closed during special festivals or occasions, and it is always advisable to confirm the timings before planning a visit. Also, it is worth noting that there can be long queues to enter the temple during peak hours, so it is recommended to plan accordingly and arrive early to avoid the rush.

Best Time to Visit

The temple is open throughout the year, but the best time to visit the Kamakhya Temple is during the Ambubachi Mela festival, which usually takes place in the month of June. During this time, the temple is crowded with devotees and tourists who come to witness the unique rituals and customs associated with the festival.

Places to visit near Kamakhya Temple

There are several places to visit near the Kamakhya Temple in Guwahati, Assam. Here are some of the most popular ones:

Umananda Island

Located in the middle of the Brahmaputra River, Umananda Island is home to the Umananda Temple, dedicated to Lord Shiva. The island can be reached by ferry from the banks of the river near Kamakhya Temple.

Assam State Zoo

The Assam State Zoo is a popular attraction located about 5 kilometers from the Kamakhya Temple. It is home to a wide variety of animals, including tigers, lions, elephants, and rhinos.

Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary

Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary is located about 50 kilometers from Guwahati and is home to the Indian one-horned rhinoceros. It is a popular destination for wildlife enthusiasts.

Sualkuchi

Sualkuchi is a small town located about 25 kilometers from Guwahati, known for its silk weaving industry. Visitors can witness the process of silk weaving and buy silk products at affordable prices.

Guwahati Planetarium

The Guwahati Planetarium is a popular attraction located about 6 kilometers from Kamakhya Temple. It features shows on astronomy and space exploration and is a great place to learn about the universe.

Deepor Beel Wildlife Sanctuary

Deepor Beel Wildlife Sanctuary is located about 15 kilometers from Guwahati and is home to a wide variety of bird species. It is a popular destination for birdwatchers.

Hotels near Kamakhya Temple

There are several hotels and accommodations options near the Kamakhya Temple in Guwahati, Assam. Here are some of the most popular ones:

Hotel Lilawati Grand

This is a budget-friendly hotel located just 2 kilometers from Kamakhya Temple. It offers comfortable rooms, a restaurant, and free Wi-Fi.

Ginger Hotel Guwahati

This is a mid-range hotel located about 6 kilometers from Kamakhya Temple. It offers well-equipped rooms, a restaurant, and a fitness center.

Radisson Blu Hotel Guwahati

This is a luxury hotel located about 12 kilometers from Kamakhya Temple. It offers spacious rooms, a spa, a fitness center, and several dining options.

Vivanta Guwahati

This is a luxury hotel located about 11 kilometers from Kamakhya Temple. It offers elegant rooms, a spa, a fitness center, and several dining options.

Hotel Palacio

This is a budget-friendly hotel located just 3 kilometers from Kamakhya Temple. It offers basic amenities like comfortable rooms, a restaurant, and free Wi-Fi.

Hotel Prag Continental

This is a mid-range hotel located about 5 kilometers from Kamakhya Temple. It offers comfortable rooms, a restaurant, and free Wi-Fi.

How to Get to Kamahya Temple

The Kamakhya Temple is located in Guwahati, Assam, and can be reached by several modes of transportation. Here's how to get there:

  • By air: The nearest airport to the Kamakhya Temple is the Lokpriya Gopinath Bordoloi International Airport in Guwahati, which is about 20 kilometers away. From the airport, you can hire a taxi or take a bus to reach the temple.
  • By train: Guwahati Railway Station is the nearest railway station, which is about 7 kilometers from the temple. The station is well-connected to major cities in India, and you can hire a taxi or take a bus to reach the temple.
  • By bus: Guwahati is well-connected by road to other major cities in Assam and neighboring states. You can take a bus to the Guwahati bus stand and then hire a taxi or take a bus to reach the temple.
  • By taxi: Taxis are easily available in Guwahati and can be hired to reach the Kamakhya Temple.
  • By auto-rickshaw: Auto-rickshaws are a convenient mode of transportation in Guwahati and can be hired to reach the Kamakhya Temple.

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